When Your Child... Feels Shy at the Start of a Playdate

2-min. video | Open Door For Parents with Dr. Eileen

(82 sec. Video transcript at bottom.)

This week’s video offers an easy tip to help your child get past the awkwardness that can happen when a guest first arrives.

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Video Transcript:

At the start of a playdate, there’s often an awkward moment where one kid says, “What do you want to do?” and the other kid says, “I dunno. What do you want to do?”

To avoid this, have your child think ahead of time of two possible things to do with the friend. When the friend arrives, your child can ask something like, “Do you want do ride bike, or do you want to build with Legos?” With just two choice, it will be easier for the guest to decide.

This way, the kids can more quickly get to the fun of  playing together. 

If the guest starts to look bored with an activity, then your child can offer two more choices.

You may also need to remind your child not to wander off and leave the guest alone. It’s also not a good idea to set up a scenario where the guest has just passively watch your child play instead of actively being involved in the game. Those scenarios are no fun at all. 

Explain to your child that it’s the job of a host to try to make sure the guest has a good time.